Archives For civility

Want to bring your career to a halt or worse?

If your answer is “no” then you ought to consider what you should and should not talk about at work.

We must control both what we say and how much we share in our professional life. The word “professional” turns many people off because they associate it with corporate stuffiness.

Definition of PROFESSIONALISM

1: the conduct, aims, or qualities that characterize or mark a profession or a professional person(see 1professional)

2: the following of a profession (as athletics) for gain or livelihood

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/professionalism

Consider the “conduct, aims, or qualities” of professionalism in relation to your conversation at work.

Success in your career can hinge on the appropriateness of your casual conversations at work. Aim high! Here are two resources that will help.

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/business/worklife/seven-things-you-shouldnt-tell-your-colleagues/story-fni0d8zj-1226586820029

http://careerplanning.about.com/od/workplacesurvival/tp/work_talk.htm

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Do you ever feel awkward making an introduction?

Do you know who to introduce to whom?

Does it matter?

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Or, maybe you have figured this out—care to share any tips, pointers, or thoughts on how to introduce people without fear?

Maybe you’re comfortable in personal social situations, but a bit uncertain in professional social situations.

Please share your experience!

We’ll talk more about introductions as the week progresses . . .

Have you had any awkward moments making introductions—something memorable that occurred?

Or, how do you feel when you are introduced in a way that is respectful and courteous?

Are You A Courteous Person?

The one thing courteous people understand is that courtesy means being willing to adjust your behavior to the needs and feelings of other people.

Courteous people understand that their fellow human beings are not perfect. They would never embarrass or degrade anyone – but rather do what is necessary to put everyone at ease. This is not to say that courteous people are spineless but that they operate from principles and know how to react in advance, when someone’s behavior or speech becomes inappropriate.

The most courteous people understand more than just the basics of the rules of etiquette. Some may not even know it by that name, but they live by it anyway. Etiquette is grounded in timeless principles; it never goes out of style. In our ever-changing world of codes and behaviors and new customs, etiquette prepares those who face and engage our others to be prepared and interact and behave with courtesy and respect for all.

Civilization would not be civilized if it were not held together by this glue of civility. Just think about places in the world that lack the value of civility and courtesy – human life and property are things that can be used to intimidate or manipulate other people. But in civilized cultures, we do not allow the threat of destruction of human life and property to be used in such a manner. To violate that code of conduct is to break civil law.

If Emily Post was right, and civility is the glue that holds our society together, imagine the bonding power it can have in our place of business, in our schools, and in our families. Whereas some adhesives do not hold as well when used excessively, this is one glue that we want to be used as much as possible.

Know someone who has made an impression on you with their courtesy? Let them know it. Or let them know it and tweet about it.